Rosh Hashanah And How To Celebrate The Jewish New Year

Rosh Hashanah And How To Celebrate The Jewish New Year

Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent.
As Jews, we are told that on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, “it is written” and on Yom Kippur, the Day of Repentence, “it is sealed.” What is “it”? Our fate for the next year. Where is it written and sealed? In the proverbial Book of Life.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

Akedah- this is the biblical passage recited on Rosh Hashanah that speaks of the story of how God tested Abraham’s faith when he was asked to sacrifice his son Isaac.

September 19th is one of the Boston Party Planning Page’s favorite holidays. International Talk Like a Pirate Day began with two goofy guys who wanted an excuse to talk like pirates. Gather yer scurvey mates and throw a party with eye patches and rum!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

You don’t need to wait till September 18 to begin using this greeting since, like the non-Jewish person uses “Happy New Year” from a few days before, so does the Jew. So, if you run into friends who greet you with “Shana Tova,” smile and greet them the same way, right back. If you wish to use a greeting more specific to the Day of Atonement you can wait to begin using that till after September 19 though the rule is never hard and fast. And remember, as you do, that you are following a tradition which was followed by the Lord Jesus Christ, himself.

Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent.
As Jews, we are told that on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, “it is written” and on Yom Kippur, the Day of Repentence, “it is sealed.” What is “it”? Our fate for the next year. Where is it written and sealed? In the proverbial Book of Life.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

Akedah- this is the biblical passage recited on Rosh Hashanah that speaks of the story of how God tested Abraham’s faith when he was asked to sacrifice his son Isaac.

September 19th is one of the Boston Party Planning Page’s favorite holidays. International Talk Like a Pirate Day began with two goofy guys who wanted an excuse to talk like pirates. Gather yer scurvey mates and throw a party with eye patches and rum!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

You don’t need to wait till September 18 to begin using this greeting since, like the non-Jewish person uses “Happy New Year” from a few days before, so does the Jew. So, if you run into friends who greet you with “Shana Tova,” smile and greet them the same way, right back. If you wish to use a greeting more specific to the Day of Atonement you can wait to begin using that till after September 19 though the rule is never hard and fast. And remember, as you do, that you are following a tradition which was followed by the Lord Jesus Christ, himself.