Rosh Hashanah Cards - Sounding The Shofar

Rosh Hashanah Cards – Sounding The Shofar

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. I usually don’t celebrate Jewish holidays since most of my friends practice other religions. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes.
The first day of Tishrei marks Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. On this day, Jewish people observe the first of the High Holy Days. Rosh Hashanah is also a time that Jews celebrate G-d’s creation of the world and embark on personal paths of repentance. The holiday is deeply meaningful and a perfect time for parents to teach their children about Jewish customs. One of the best ways to celebrate and learn about Rosh Hashanah is through crafts inspired by the holiday.

Now it all boils down to Iraq. Think logically; in the 2000 elections here in the US there was uproar because the race was so extremely close and every vote was critical. It was hysteria in both the Democratic and Republican parties. Now add fundamental religious extremists and strict laws abiding by the Qu’ran. You have Iraq. Whoever is running the country at the time will most certainly transfer his religion into all departments and rid himself of the other Islamic sect. But why can’t they live in peace, surely Jews and Christians coexist peacefully in the White House?

If you prefer to buy from Israel, you can find a number of online dealers. You can also find shofars at your local Judaica dealer, but prices are often marked up significantly.

So now everyone can enjoy the sweet taste of honey cake on Rosh Hashanah and all year round. Here’s the recipe. We use whole whet flour and no one is the wiser.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

It was not until the 1500’s and the introduction of the Gregorian calendar that the New Year began to be observed on January 1. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. I usually don’t celebrate Jewish holidays since most of my friends practice other religions. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes.
The first day of Tishrei marks Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. On this day, Jewish people observe the first of the High Holy Days. Rosh Hashanah is also a time that Jews celebrate G-d’s creation of the world and embark on personal paths of repentance. The holiday is deeply meaningful and a perfect time for parents to teach their children about Jewish customs. One of the best ways to celebrate and learn about Rosh Hashanah is through crafts inspired by the holiday.

Now it all boils down to Iraq. Think logically; in the 2000 elections here in the US there was uproar because the race was so extremely close and every vote was critical. It was hysteria in both the Democratic and Republican parties. Now add fundamental religious extremists and strict laws abiding by the Qu’ran. You have Iraq. Whoever is running the country at the time will most certainly transfer his religion into all departments and rid himself of the other Islamic sect. But why can’t they live in peace, surely Jews and Christians coexist peacefully in the White House?

If you prefer to buy from Israel, you can find a number of online dealers. You can also find shofars at your local Judaica dealer, but prices are often marked up significantly.

So now everyone can enjoy the sweet taste of honey cake on Rosh Hashanah and all year round. Here’s the recipe. We use whole whet flour and no one is the wiser.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

It was not until the 1500’s and the introduction of the Gregorian calendar that the New Year began to be observed on January 1. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.