Rosh Hashanah Cards - The Book Of Life

Rosh Hashanah Cards – The Book Of Life

The chill in the air in September can be the perfect way to make your reception a warm cozy affair. The good news is that weekday wedding are much cheaper for everyone. However, it is always a good idea to consider religious observances.

Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Pomegranate is a favoured fruit for the New Year. On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, a “new fruit” is eaten -ie a fruit that has recently come into season but no one round the table has yet had the opportunity to eat. A pomegranate is often used as this new fruit. In the Bible, the Land of Israel is praised for its pomegranates. It is also said that this fruit contains 613 seeds, just as there are 613 mitzvot (commandments). Another reason given for blessing and eating pomegranate, is the desire that good deeds in the ensuing year, will be as plentiful as the seeds of the pomegranate.

The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead. It is how we live in the days after the Day of Atonement that gives significance to all the observances.

Does this seem backwards to anyone but me? Shouldn’t we be letting in the wandering Jews who want to pray on the High Holy Days – the ones who don’t come the rest of the year – in the hopes of getting them to come back on Shabbat? Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

As we mentioned earlier, June is the most popular month for weddings. But each season has a top month for nuptials. Once the season has been selected, couples are encouraged to shop around for the best deals at reception halls and from caterers. If you are considering an outdoor affair, weather is always the most pressing concern. The spring may be wetter than the summer, but since most couples rent tents, it shouldn’t be an issue.

For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

The chill in the air in September can be the perfect way to make your reception a warm cozy affair. The good news is that weekday wedding are much cheaper for everyone. However, it is always a good idea to consider religious observances.

Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Pomegranate is a favoured fruit for the New Year. On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, a “new fruit” is eaten -ie a fruit that has recently come into season but no one round the table has yet had the opportunity to eat. A pomegranate is often used as this new fruit. In the Bible, the Land of Israel is praised for its pomegranates. It is also said that this fruit contains 613 seeds, just as there are 613 mitzvot (commandments). Another reason given for blessing and eating pomegranate, is the desire that good deeds in the ensuing year, will be as plentiful as the seeds of the pomegranate.

The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead. It is how we live in the days after the Day of Atonement that gives significance to all the observances.

Does this seem backwards to anyone but me? Shouldn’t we be letting in the wandering Jews who want to pray on the High Holy Days – the ones who don’t come the rest of the year – in the hopes of getting them to come back on Shabbat? Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

As we mentioned earlier, June is the most popular month for weddings. But each season has a top month for nuptials. Once the season has been selected, couples are encouraged to shop around for the best deals at reception halls and from caterers. If you are considering an outdoor affair, weather is always the most pressing concern. The spring may be wetter than the summer, but since most couples rent tents, it shouldn’t be an issue.

For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?