Rosh Hashanah Memories I Will Always Cherish

Rosh Hashanah Memories I Will Always Cherish

There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95. You can find out more at the Glenview House website. Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day.

Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day. This dates back to the early Romans who exchanges branches of palms and bay laurel as tokens of good luck. Shop keepers in ancient Persia (Iran), gave eggs to their customers symbolizing new life and new beginnings.

We may find ourselves in the mood to work hard on special projects on Labor Day, the first day of Ramadan, and most of the first week of September, with the Sun joining the Jupiter-Saturn concord. The Sun is in Virgo, so its time for harvest. We are going to be feeling those instinctive instructions to work hard and reap our crops, and we should find it easy to focus them into our businesses and our homes. It may be time for some Fall housecleaning. I have an article called, “Jupiter Trine Saturn – Ready to Work Hard,” if you would like to read more.

Since Rosh Hashanah is Hebrew for “head of the year,” some Jews serve the head of animals as part of their meal. Many opt for the head of a fish. In this tradition, the fish is symbolic of many things. The eyes of the fish denote knowledge, because the eyes of the fish are always open. For others, the fish is seen as a symbol of prosperity and fertility. After the fish is placed on the table, the common prayer asking that the family be more like leaders than followers is made.

Some of the highlights include National Flower Week (during the 3rd week of September) and National Dog Week (during the 4th week), so host a dinner party with fresh flowers or throw a fiesta for Fido.

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

Our destiny, our fate for the next year remains sealed not until next Yom Kippur, however, but until we make a new choice, think a new thought, get into a different emotional pattern.or God feels the need to take us in hand. That’s cocreation at it’s best.

There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95. You can find out more at the Glenview House website. Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day.

Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day. This dates back to the early Romans who exchanges branches of palms and bay laurel as tokens of good luck. Shop keepers in ancient Persia (Iran), gave eggs to their customers symbolizing new life and new beginnings.

We may find ourselves in the mood to work hard on special projects on Labor Day, the first day of Ramadan, and most of the first week of September, with the Sun joining the Jupiter-Saturn concord. The Sun is in Virgo, so its time for harvest. We are going to be feeling those instinctive instructions to work hard and reap our crops, and we should find it easy to focus them into our businesses and our homes. It may be time for some Fall housecleaning. I have an article called, “Jupiter Trine Saturn – Ready to Work Hard,” if you would like to read more.

Since Rosh Hashanah is Hebrew for “head of the year,” some Jews serve the head of animals as part of their meal. Many opt for the head of a fish. In this tradition, the fish is symbolic of many things. The eyes of the fish denote knowledge, because the eyes of the fish are always open. For others, the fish is seen as a symbol of prosperity and fertility. After the fish is placed on the table, the common prayer asking that the family be more like leaders than followers is made.

Some of the highlights include National Flower Week (during the 3rd week of September) and National Dog Week (during the 4th week), so host a dinner party with fresh flowers or throw a fiesta for Fido.

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

Our destiny, our fate for the next year remains sealed not until next Yom Kippur, however, but until we make a new choice, think a new thought, get into a different emotional pattern.or God feels the need to take us in hand. That’s cocreation at it’s best.