Rosh Hashanah Tips On Celebrating The High Holy Days

Rosh Hashanah Tips On Celebrating The High Holy Days

After the destruction of the Temple, the use of the shofar began to be exclusively used for religious ceremonies and events. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead. It is how we live in the days after the Day of Atonement that gives significance to all the observances.

Making the case of respecting our fellow brothers and sisters why not include everyone by saying “Happy holidays?” I do realize you may offend the atheist who can write his or her own essay.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

As such, the shofar is not sounded on Shabbat. Even if Rosh Hashanah, which requires the mitzvah of sounding the shofar, falls on Shabbat, the special horn is not blown. While the practice seems Rabbinical in nature, it may relate to the prohibition against labor during the Shabbat.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

For the ordinary wandering Jews wanting to be accepted back into the fold and finding the door closed, maybe it’s just easier to walk down the street to a church. There Jews can just accept Jesus (a fellow Jew), be declared “saved” and know they will go to heaven. And they can do this on any day of the week free of charge.

Rabbi Dan Moskovitz and Jason Mesches wrote the lyrics for “Call Your Zeyde”. Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. You can find it on YouTube. After watching the video, call your zeyde (grandfather) or any other relative you miss, and wish them a sweet year.

After the destruction of the Temple, the use of the shofar began to be exclusively used for religious ceremonies and events. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead. It is how we live in the days after the Day of Atonement that gives significance to all the observances.

Making the case of respecting our fellow brothers and sisters why not include everyone by saying “Happy holidays?” I do realize you may offend the atheist who can write his or her own essay.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

As such, the shofar is not sounded on Shabbat. Even if Rosh Hashanah, which requires the mitzvah of sounding the shofar, falls on Shabbat, the special horn is not blown. While the practice seems Rabbinical in nature, it may relate to the prohibition against labor during the Shabbat.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

For the ordinary wandering Jews wanting to be accepted back into the fold and finding the door closed, maybe it’s just easier to walk down the street to a church. There Jews can just accept Jesus (a fellow Jew), be declared “saved” and know they will go to heaven. And they can do this on any day of the week free of charge.

Rabbi Dan Moskovitz and Jason Mesches wrote the lyrics for “Call Your Zeyde”. Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. You can find it on YouTube. After watching the video, call your zeyde (grandfather) or any other relative you miss, and wish them a sweet year.