Salt Lake Jewish Community Center Celebrates Rosh Hashanah

Salt Lake Jewish Community Center Celebrates Rosh Hashanah

But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration. We ask God to save us, be merciful and forgive us for any sins we may have committed. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.

Amongst the more popular themes found on Rosh Hashanah cards is the wish that the recipient be inscribed in the Book of Life. This idea stems from the tradition that Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, marks the creation of the world. As such, it is a time of judgment when all men must stand before the Almighty and face a reckoning of their deeds from the past year.

In Biblical and Torah texts, the Promised Land was noted to be a place overflowing with milk and honey. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom. On the first night of the holiday, Jews dip challah and offer a blessing over the bread. Next, apples are dipped into honey and a prayer for a sweet year is offered.

New York temple Chabad of the West 60s is trying to make it easier for observant fashion industry workers to accomodate both their job and their religion, by offering free services for Fashion Week attendees.

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration. We ask God to save us, be merciful and forgive us for any sins we may have committed. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.

Amongst the more popular themes found on Rosh Hashanah cards is the wish that the recipient be inscribed in the Book of Life. This idea stems from the tradition that Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, marks the creation of the world. As such, it is a time of judgment when all men must stand before the Almighty and face a reckoning of their deeds from the past year.

In Biblical and Torah texts, the Promised Land was noted to be a place overflowing with milk and honey. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom. On the first night of the holiday, Jews dip challah and offer a blessing over the bread. Next, apples are dipped into honey and a prayer for a sweet year is offered.

New York temple Chabad of the West 60s is trying to make it easier for observant fashion industry workers to accomodate both their job and their religion, by offering free services for Fashion Week attendees.

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

Salt Lake Jewish Community Center Celebrates Rosh Hashanah

Salt Lake Jewish Community Center Celebrates Rosh Hashanah

But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration. We ask God to save us, be merciful and forgive us for any sins we may have committed. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.

Amongst the more popular themes found on Rosh Hashanah cards is the wish that the recipient be inscribed in the Book of Life. This idea stems from the tradition that Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, marks the creation of the world. As such, it is a time of judgment when all men must stand before the Almighty and face a reckoning of their deeds from the past year.

In Biblical and Torah texts, the Promised Land was noted to be a place overflowing with milk and honey. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom. On the first night of the holiday, Jews dip challah and offer a blessing over the bread. Next, apples are dipped into honey and a prayer for a sweet year is offered.

New York temple Chabad of the West 60s is trying to make it easier for observant fashion industry workers to accomodate both their job and their religion, by offering free services for Fashion Week attendees.

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration. We ask God to save us, be merciful and forgive us for any sins we may have committed. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.

Amongst the more popular themes found on Rosh Hashanah cards is the wish that the recipient be inscribed in the Book of Life. This idea stems from the tradition that Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, marks the creation of the world. As such, it is a time of judgment when all men must stand before the Almighty and face a reckoning of their deeds from the past year.

In Biblical and Torah texts, the Promised Land was noted to be a place overflowing with milk and honey. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom. On the first night of the holiday, Jews dip challah and offer a blessing over the bread. Next, apples are dipped into honey and a prayer for a sweet year is offered.

New York temple Chabad of the West 60s is trying to make it easier for observant fashion industry workers to accomodate both their job and their religion, by offering free services for Fashion Week attendees.

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?