Shofar And Sweets: My Favorite Rosh Hashanah Memories

Shofar And Sweets: My Favorite Rosh Hashanah Memories

Say a Jew became president and enforced all American families to convert, made his Cabinet, Congress, and the Senate Jewish. Our calendars would be rewritten to have Rosh Hashanah be the New Year.
Use the therapist’s secret. When you’re facing a battleaxe relative, win by refusing to fight. Accept comments about your appearance, weight or singlehood that used to upset you with a nod and say “That’s the way you see it.” This really throws them and saves you from a lot of holiday stress.

Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day. This dates back to the early Romans who exchanges branches of palms and bay laurel as tokens of good luck. Shop keepers in ancient Persia (Iran), gave eggs to their customers symbolizing new life and new beginnings.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

Rosh Hashanah is the first day of the Hebrew year. It is called Rosh Hashanah since “rosh” means head and “shanah” is year – the “ha” part makes the whole “head (or beginning of) the year” So, when you meet them, it is nice to wish your Jewish friends a happy new year. “Happy New Year” or the Hebrew equivalent “Shana Tova” are appropriate greetings.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

Sound the shofar! It is more than just a ram’s horn! The shofar is both an important symbol of Jewish culture and an instrument that heralds significant festivals, covenants and beliefs of the Jewish people.

Say a Jew became president and enforced all American families to convert, made his Cabinet, Congress, and the Senate Jewish. Our calendars would be rewritten to have Rosh Hashanah be the New Year.
Use the therapist’s secret. When you’re facing a battleaxe relative, win by refusing to fight. Accept comments about your appearance, weight or singlehood that used to upset you with a nod and say “That’s the way you see it.” This really throws them and saves you from a lot of holiday stress.

Many people around the world exchange gifts on New Year’s Day. This dates back to the early Romans who exchanges branches of palms and bay laurel as tokens of good luck. Shop keepers in ancient Persia (Iran), gave eggs to their customers symbolizing new life and new beginnings.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

Rosh Hashanah is the first day of the Hebrew year. It is called Rosh Hashanah since “rosh” means head and “shanah” is year – the “ha” part makes the whole “head (or beginning of) the year” So, when you meet them, it is nice to wish your Jewish friends a happy new year. “Happy New Year” or the Hebrew equivalent “Shana Tova” are appropriate greetings.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

Sound the shofar! It is more than just a ram’s horn! The shofar is both an important symbol of Jewish culture and an instrument that heralds significant festivals, covenants and beliefs of the Jewish people.