Shofar And Sweets: My Favorite Rosh Hashanah Memories

Shofar And Sweets: My Favorite Rosh Hashanah Memories

It must be known that these may continue to give out the smell of bleach for almost a month. Please do not send me a card with Jesus in a manger. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting.
I work for the Los Angeles Unified School District. We have Monday off due to Rosh Hashanah. I want to explain this holiday to my students, but know very little. Would you please educate me?

Fish is frequently eaten. You may be surprised to see a fish head on a platter on the table. Fish are so numerous, that they are often used as a symbol of fertility and prosperity.

Stop worrying about looking good. Maybe you’ve just broken up with someone who your parents liked. You feel loser-like, vulnerable and lonely coming to the family dinner. You worry about how you are dressed, the extra pounds you’ve put on and various other assorted silly ideas. Realize that the way they see you doesn’t really matter. Underneath whatever they say, they probably love you to pieces. So forget about looking good. Your real job is to have fun and enjoy yourself.

This Sunday evening ushers in Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Though the Christian calendar reads September 16, 2012, the Jewish calendar reports Elul 29, 5772, the last day of the year. The next day, Tishre 1, 5773 begins the New Year.

The Israelites had become utterly faithful about keeping Passover by the time Jesus and His disciples gathered in the Upper Room. Before the Babylonian exile, this was not always the case. Their inconsistency in keeping Passover was part of a long, sad story of unfaithfulness to the Old Covenant. Their story is a microcosm of our story. But we come again to the table tonight to celebrate our liberation from slavery, for the re-presentation of the greatest Passover of all. Jesus, the innocent, unblemished Lamb of God, our Passover, is sacrificed for us to take away the sin of the world.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

Shofar- This is a ram’s horn and it was used in ancient times to get everyone together. Someone blows into the Shofar when it is Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur. It reminds people that it is the New Year. Also, it is a divine summons to repentance and improvement.

It must be known that these may continue to give out the smell of bleach for almost a month. Please do not send me a card with Jesus in a manger. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting.
I work for the Los Angeles Unified School District. We have Monday off due to Rosh Hashanah. I want to explain this holiday to my students, but know very little. Would you please educate me?

Fish is frequently eaten. You may be surprised to see a fish head on a platter on the table. Fish are so numerous, that they are often used as a symbol of fertility and prosperity.

Stop worrying about looking good. Maybe you’ve just broken up with someone who your parents liked. You feel loser-like, vulnerable and lonely coming to the family dinner. You worry about how you are dressed, the extra pounds you’ve put on and various other assorted silly ideas. Realize that the way they see you doesn’t really matter. Underneath whatever they say, they probably love you to pieces. So forget about looking good. Your real job is to have fun and enjoy yourself.

This Sunday evening ushers in Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Though the Christian calendar reads September 16, 2012, the Jewish calendar reports Elul 29, 5772, the last day of the year. The next day, Tishre 1, 5773 begins the New Year.

The Israelites had become utterly faithful about keeping Passover by the time Jesus and His disciples gathered in the Upper Room. Before the Babylonian exile, this was not always the case. Their inconsistency in keeping Passover was part of a long, sad story of unfaithfulness to the Old Covenant. Their story is a microcosm of our story. But we come again to the table tonight to celebrate our liberation from slavery, for the re-presentation of the greatest Passover of all. Jesus, the innocent, unblemished Lamb of God, our Passover, is sacrificed for us to take away the sin of the world.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

Shofar- This is a ram’s horn and it was used in ancient times to get everyone together. Someone blows into the Shofar when it is Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur. It reminds people that it is the New Year. Also, it is a divine summons to repentance and improvement.