Some Rosh Hashanah Dinner Recipe Ideas

Some Rosh Hashanah Dinner Recipe Ideas

In some recipe variations, apple and honey cakes are offered as breakfast cakes similar to muffins. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.

The average American engagement lasts sixteen months. Most of that time is spent planning the wedding. Couples spend between seven and twelve months getting ready for their big day. But choosing the date isn’t always easy. There are 365 calendar days (or more) to choose from. Where to start?

So our first reading tonight recalls God’s commands to Moses before the Israelites observed their first Passover, the one done literally on the verge of flight from their slavery in Egypt. “The first month of the year” does not refer to the start of the Jewish calendar year; as is well known, Rosh Hashanah occurs in the fall. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year. Their seder is a “re-presentation” of all that happened to them; they are to regard themselves as being themselves in Egypt, about to be liberated from physical slavery, ready to flee as soon as they receive the word.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. Our government knows nothing about the internal functioning of their culture and Islam as a way of life and being is unfathomable to Christian Americans. No matter who you put into power as president in Iraq today, it will always be contested because the leader will always be biased towards their sect (Sunni or Shiite) and one or the other will always end up being discriminated.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

In some recipe variations, apple and honey cakes are offered as breakfast cakes similar to muffins. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.

The average American engagement lasts sixteen months. Most of that time is spent planning the wedding. Couples spend between seven and twelve months getting ready for their big day. But choosing the date isn’t always easy. There are 365 calendar days (or more) to choose from. Where to start?

So our first reading tonight recalls God’s commands to Moses before the Israelites observed their first Passover, the one done literally on the verge of flight from their slavery in Egypt. “The first month of the year” does not refer to the start of the Jewish calendar year; as is well known, Rosh Hashanah occurs in the fall. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year. Their seder is a “re-presentation” of all that happened to them; they are to regard themselves as being themselves in Egypt, about to be liberated from physical slavery, ready to flee as soon as they receive the word.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. Our government knows nothing about the internal functioning of their culture and Islam as a way of life and being is unfathomable to Christian Americans. No matter who you put into power as president in Iraq today, it will always be contested because the leader will always be biased towards their sect (Sunni or Shiite) and one or the other will always end up being discriminated.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.