Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids - Review

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids – Review

I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Samples are generally taken from “scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Samples are generally taken from “scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids - Review

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids – Review

I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Samples are generally taken from “scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Samples are generally taken from “scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.