Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids - Review

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids – Review

Not that this’ll be chill-type music though, for these acts will have you dancing into the morning. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business? And then I started getting remixes and production.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in for Best Rap Album breakbeat becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Not that this’ll be chill-type music though, for these acts will have you dancing into the morning. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business? And then I started getting remixes and production.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in for Best Rap Album breakbeat becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids - Review

Sultry Soul Songstress Amanda Davids – Review

Not that this’ll be chill-type music though, for these acts will have you dancing into the morning. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business? And then I started getting remixes and production.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in for Best Rap Album breakbeat becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Not that this’ll be chill-type music though, for these acts will have you dancing into the morning. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business? And then I started getting remixes and production.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in for Best Rap Album breakbeat becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.