The Blowing Of The Shofar

The Blowing Of The Shofar

That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room. Their effort played a major role in Detroit’s success and has stood the test of time. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

The first course will consist of chicken and matzah ball soup, which will be followed by your choice of lemon and olive roasted chicken or sweet brisket. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel. The meal will end with a dessert of cherry and apple crumble.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room. Their effort played a major role in Detroit’s success and has stood the test of time. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

The first course will consist of chicken and matzah ball soup, which will be followed by your choice of lemon and olive roasted chicken or sweet brisket. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel. The meal will end with a dessert of cherry and apple crumble.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

The Blowing Of The Shofar

The Blowing Of The Shofar

That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room. Their effort played a major role in Detroit’s success and has stood the test of time. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

The first course will consist of chicken and matzah ball soup, which will be followed by your choice of lemon and olive roasted chicken or sweet brisket. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel. The meal will end with a dessert of cherry and apple crumble.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room. Their effort played a major role in Detroit’s success and has stood the test of time. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

The first course will consist of chicken and matzah ball soup, which will be followed by your choice of lemon and olive roasted chicken or sweet brisket. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel. The meal will end with a dessert of cherry and apple crumble.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.