Thoughts Off The Top Of My Rosh (Hashanah)

Thoughts Off The Top Of My Rosh (Hashanah)

Saturday is the most popular day of the week for weddings. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Another special food we eat on Rosh Hashanah is honey. First we dip challah, braided egg bread, into honey. The challah is baked in a spiral shape symbolizing the continuity of Creation. Then slices of apple are dipped as we say a prayer asking God for a sweet year.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

So don’t forget when Christmas comes around to wish me a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! I like Christmas. especially when I get to dress up in a Santa Claus outfit and beautiful women sit on my knee.

Saturday is the most popular day of the week for weddings. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Another special food we eat on Rosh Hashanah is honey. First we dip challah, braided egg bread, into honey. The challah is baked in a spiral shape symbolizing the continuity of Creation. Then slices of apple are dipped as we say a prayer asking God for a sweet year.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

So don’t forget when Christmas comes around to wish me a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! I like Christmas. especially when I get to dress up in a Santa Claus outfit and beautiful women sit on my knee.

Thoughts Off The Top Of My Rosh (Hashanah)

Thoughts Off The Top Of My Rosh (Hashanah)

Saturday is the most popular day of the week for weddings. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Another special food we eat on Rosh Hashanah is honey. First we dip challah, braided egg bread, into honey. The challah is baked in a spiral shape symbolizing the continuity of Creation. Then slices of apple are dipped as we say a prayer asking God for a sweet year.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

So don’t forget when Christmas comes around to wish me a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! I like Christmas. especially when I get to dress up in a Santa Claus outfit and beautiful women sit on my knee.

Saturday is the most popular day of the week for weddings. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Another special food we eat on Rosh Hashanah is honey. First we dip challah, braided egg bread, into honey. The challah is baked in a spiral shape symbolizing the continuity of Creation. Then slices of apple are dipped as we say a prayer asking God for a sweet year.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

Honey Dishes: The tradition of dipping apples in honey is a seasonal tradition that makes the most of the year’s harvest. The pilgrims couldn’t have done better. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. As guests may want to engage in this activity as an appetizer, or while standing. Use different glass serving dishes and bowls for best effect. If you’re serving different types of honey; lavender, organic or traditional varieties, labeling the bowls isn’t a bad idea!

So don’t forget when Christmas comes around to wish me a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! I like Christmas. especially when I get to dress up in a Santa Claus outfit and beautiful women sit on my knee.