Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. By the time we threw an entire loaf my parents and sisters were all crying in each other’s arms. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

Christians are a bit less strict, but there are still a few days that are all but verboten. Practicing Christians do not marry during the Holy Week, which is from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday. In fact, any Sunday is a gamble. Some churches find Sunday ceremonies auspicious and joyful, while others eschew ceremonies on the day of rest. It really does depend upon your denomination and that of most of your guests. Whenever possible, it is best to err on the side of caution. If your soon-to-be-in-laws are devoutly religious, stay away from days they might perceive as sacred.

The shofar is unique in that it is a musical instrument typically created from the horn of a kosher male animal. According to Rabbi Moshe Gallante II’s Elef Hamagen, the horn preferences delineate with the curved ram horn, curved other sheep horn, curved other animal horn and straight ram’s horn being the order of most preferred to least. If non-kosher animal horns are used, there must be a special bracha or blessing. Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred.

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

“Watch” is translated from the Greek word, gregoreo, meaning be awake. We can’t be awake every night, but there is only one night in the year that believers were commanded to watch. It was Passover, Exodus 12:10,42. Christ understood this and asked His disciples to watch (Matt 26:38-41) but we think it was only because He knew what was coming that night.

Bring to a boil, 1/4 cup of honey, 1 tbsp. water and 1 tbsp. lemon juice. After cake has cooled for 10 minutes, poke holes around the cake and drizzle the sauce on the cake, making sure to get the sauce into the holes.

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. By the time we threw an entire loaf my parents and sisters were all crying in each other’s arms. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

Christians are a bit less strict, but there are still a few days that are all but verboten. Practicing Christians do not marry during the Holy Week, which is from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday. In fact, any Sunday is a gamble. Some churches find Sunday ceremonies auspicious and joyful, while others eschew ceremonies on the day of rest. It really does depend upon your denomination and that of most of your guests. Whenever possible, it is best to err on the side of caution. If your soon-to-be-in-laws are devoutly religious, stay away from days they might perceive as sacred.

The shofar is unique in that it is a musical instrument typically created from the horn of a kosher male animal. According to Rabbi Moshe Gallante II’s Elef Hamagen, the horn preferences delineate with the curved ram horn, curved other sheep horn, curved other animal horn and straight ram’s horn being the order of most preferred to least. If non-kosher animal horns are used, there must be a special bracha or blessing. Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred.

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

“Watch” is translated from the Greek word, gregoreo, meaning be awake. We can’t be awake every night, but there is only one night in the year that believers were commanded to watch. It was Passover, Exodus 12:10,42. Christ understood this and asked His disciples to watch (Matt 26:38-41) but we think it was only because He knew what was coming that night.

Bring to a boil, 1/4 cup of honey, 1 tbsp. water and 1 tbsp. lemon juice. After cake has cooled for 10 minutes, poke holes around the cake and drizzle the sauce on the cake, making sure to get the sauce into the holes.

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. By the time we threw an entire loaf my parents and sisters were all crying in each other’s arms. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

Christians are a bit less strict, but there are still a few days that are all but verboten. Practicing Christians do not marry during the Holy Week, which is from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday. In fact, any Sunday is a gamble. Some churches find Sunday ceremonies auspicious and joyful, while others eschew ceremonies on the day of rest. It really does depend upon your denomination and that of most of your guests. Whenever possible, it is best to err on the side of caution. If your soon-to-be-in-laws are devoutly religious, stay away from days they might perceive as sacred.

The shofar is unique in that it is a musical instrument typically created from the horn of a kosher male animal. According to Rabbi Moshe Gallante II’s Elef Hamagen, the horn preferences delineate with the curved ram horn, curved other sheep horn, curved other animal horn and straight ram’s horn being the order of most preferred to least. If non-kosher animal horns are used, there must be a special bracha or blessing. Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred.

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

“Watch” is translated from the Greek word, gregoreo, meaning be awake. We can’t be awake every night, but there is only one night in the year that believers were commanded to watch. It was Passover, Exodus 12:10,42. Christ understood this and asked His disciples to watch (Matt 26:38-41) but we think it was only because He knew what was coming that night.

Bring to a boil, 1/4 cup of honey, 1 tbsp. water and 1 tbsp. lemon juice. After cake has cooled for 10 minutes, poke holes around the cake and drizzle the sauce on the cake, making sure to get the sauce into the holes.

The U.S. should have nothing to do with the Iraq War. By the time we threw an entire loaf my parents and sisters were all crying in each other’s arms. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies.

Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

Christians are a bit less strict, but there are still a few days that are all but verboten. Practicing Christians do not marry during the Holy Week, which is from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday. In fact, any Sunday is a gamble. Some churches find Sunday ceremonies auspicious and joyful, while others eschew ceremonies on the day of rest. It really does depend upon your denomination and that of most of your guests. Whenever possible, it is best to err on the side of caution. If your soon-to-be-in-laws are devoutly religious, stay away from days they might perceive as sacred.

The shofar is unique in that it is a musical instrument typically created from the horn of a kosher male animal. According to Rabbi Moshe Gallante II’s Elef Hamagen, the horn preferences delineate with the curved ram horn, curved other sheep horn, curved other animal horn and straight ram’s horn being the order of most preferred to least. If non-kosher animal horns are used, there must be a special bracha or blessing. Still cow horns or antlered animal horns are not preferred.

The easiest way to choose a date is by using a simple process of elimination. Start with the season you want to be married in. At present, summer is the most popular time for weddings in America. Over a third of all ceremonies are scheduled during the summer months, about half of those in the month of June. Because of its equable weather and the many options it offers couples, June will probably always be the most popular month for nuptials.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

“Watch” is translated from the Greek word, gregoreo, meaning be awake. We can’t be awake every night, but there is only one night in the year that believers were commanded to watch. It was Passover, Exodus 12:10,42. Christ understood this and asked His disciples to watch (Matt 26:38-41) but we think it was only because He knew what was coming that night.

Bring to a boil, 1/4 cup of honey, 1 tbsp. water and 1 tbsp. lemon juice. After cake has cooled for 10 minutes, poke holes around the cake and drizzle the sauce on the cake, making sure to get the sauce into the holes.