Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever.
Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

In nations where Sunnis are the majority, they can virtually have their way with the Shiites. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. Iran is 90% Shiite and 10% Sunni while Iraq is 60% Shiite and 40% Sunni. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems. The Sunnis in Iran are at a disadvantage and oppressed while their neighbors are allowed freedom in majority Sunni countries.

Avi Glatt has a huge variety of hard to find Kosher food items. They are a complete grocery store with dairy, meat, produce, bakery and meals. Some of their items are Schmerlings dill/annet falvored cheese spread 6 portions for $6.69, House Special BBQ Ribs Dinner for $20.99 and Fresh Pollock Fillets for $4.79 1 lb.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever.
Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

In nations where Sunnis are the majority, they can virtually have their way with the Shiites. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. Iran is 90% Shiite and 10% Sunni while Iraq is 60% Shiite and 40% Sunni. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems. The Sunnis in Iran are at a disadvantage and oppressed while their neighbors are allowed freedom in majority Sunni countries.

Avi Glatt has a huge variety of hard to find Kosher food items. They are a complete grocery store with dairy, meat, produce, bakery and meals. Some of their items are Schmerlings dill/annet falvored cheese spread 6 portions for $6.69, House Special BBQ Ribs Dinner for $20.99 and Fresh Pollock Fillets for $4.79 1 lb.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Wedding Feast: The Feast Of Trumpets

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever.
Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

In nations where Sunnis are the majority, they can virtually have their way with the Shiites. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. Iran is 90% Shiite and 10% Sunni while Iraq is 60% Shiite and 40% Sunni. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems. The Sunnis in Iran are at a disadvantage and oppressed while their neighbors are allowed freedom in majority Sunni countries.

Avi Glatt has a huge variety of hard to find Kosher food items. They are a complete grocery store with dairy, meat, produce, bakery and meals. Some of their items are Schmerlings dill/annet falvored cheese spread 6 portions for $6.69, House Special BBQ Ribs Dinner for $20.99 and Fresh Pollock Fillets for $4.79 1 lb.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course. And they don’t need to pay dues to attend services ever.
Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

In nations where Sunnis are the majority, they can virtually have their way with the Shiites. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. Iran is 90% Shiite and 10% Sunni while Iraq is 60% Shiite and 40% Sunni. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems. The Sunnis in Iran are at a disadvantage and oppressed while their neighbors are allowed freedom in majority Sunni countries.

Avi Glatt has a huge variety of hard to find Kosher food items. They are a complete grocery store with dairy, meat, produce, bakery and meals. Some of their items are Schmerlings dill/annet falvored cheese spread 6 portions for $6.69, House Special BBQ Ribs Dinner for $20.99 and Fresh Pollock Fillets for $4.79 1 lb.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?