What Is Rosh Hashanah?

What Is Rosh Hashanah?

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. Those of us who over did it this past week may find we hit burnout this weekend.

Rosh Hashanah is the start of the High Holy Days. It is the start of repentance. The Jewish people use the High Holy Days as a time to ask God for forgiveness and to try to make their lives better. According to the Jewish tradition, God decides who is going to live or die in the coming year. To sum it all up, Jews use this as a time to make peace with everyone they come in contact with. As Jews, we believe that God is willing to forgive people for their sins if they strive to make things better for themselves and others around them.

At the bar, stock a couple of hearty red wines. You might also want to make your signature cocktail a warm drink – a hot apple cider perhaps? Or offer the apple cider as a chilled drink while the sun is still up and then offer a hot apple cider as an after dinner treat.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

We may hit a few rough days from Tuesday, September 23rd, through the 25th with Mercury changing directions. Yes, its time for another Mercury retrograde, and usually the most difficult days of his retrograde times are when he is changing directions. Mercury will conjunct Mars as he turns around, and that means accidents! Especially automobile accidents. Drive carefully. Verbal arguments could turn physical very easily during this time, so avoid arguments at all costs. I have an article called, “Mercury Retrograde in Libra – Where is the truth?” if you would like to read more.

If you typically stick to tradition, break out of it by getting rid of the traditional things. Serve hard cider in place of wine or kosher grape juice. Try dipping apple or pear slices into premade caramel dip. Use those New Year’s Eve decorations again. No one will forget your offbeat Rosh Hashanah celebration.

Turn the chicken breast over, brush the remaining sauce over the chickens and cook, uncovered for another hour to hour and half. Make sure the chickens are golden brown and the sauce runs clear.

Couples who have a certain date in mind don’t have to bother with seasons or discounts. Tens of thousands of couples get married on Valentine’s Day, Christmas or on a date that is personally important to them. It could be the day they first met, their first date or even their parents’ wedding day. But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. Those of us who over did it this past week may find we hit burnout this weekend.

Rosh Hashanah is the start of the High Holy Days. It is the start of repentance. The Jewish people use the High Holy Days as a time to ask God for forgiveness and to try to make their lives better. According to the Jewish tradition, God decides who is going to live or die in the coming year. To sum it all up, Jews use this as a time to make peace with everyone they come in contact with. As Jews, we believe that God is willing to forgive people for their sins if they strive to make things better for themselves and others around them.

At the bar, stock a couple of hearty red wines. You might also want to make your signature cocktail a warm drink – a hot apple cider perhaps? Or offer the apple cider as a chilled drink while the sun is still up and then offer a hot apple cider as an after dinner treat.

As all good, observant Jews are well aware, the best spot to hit in North Williamsburg for all your holiday delicacies is Lee Avenue. As The Brooklyn Paper reminds us, “Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are only a week away.” Time for all observant Jews to begin feasting before they begin fasting. Consider the following Williamsburg haunts for all your requisite schmear.

We may hit a few rough days from Tuesday, September 23rd, through the 25th with Mercury changing directions. Yes, its time for another Mercury retrograde, and usually the most difficult days of his retrograde times are when he is changing directions. Mercury will conjunct Mars as he turns around, and that means accidents! Especially automobile accidents. Drive carefully. Verbal arguments could turn physical very easily during this time, so avoid arguments at all costs. I have an article called, “Mercury Retrograde in Libra – Where is the truth?” if you would like to read more.

If you typically stick to tradition, break out of it by getting rid of the traditional things. Serve hard cider in place of wine or kosher grape juice. Try dipping apple or pear slices into premade caramel dip. Use those New Year’s Eve decorations again. No one will forget your offbeat Rosh Hashanah celebration.

Turn the chicken breast over, brush the remaining sauce over the chickens and cook, uncovered for another hour to hour and half. Make sure the chickens are golden brown and the sauce runs clear.

Couples who have a certain date in mind don’t have to bother with seasons or discounts. Tens of thousands of couples get married on Valentine’s Day, Christmas or on a date that is personally important to them. It could be the day they first met, their first date or even their parents’ wedding day. But for everyone else, the process requires some cerebration.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?