What Is Rosh Hashanah?

What Is Rosh Hashanah?

He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year.

The first day of Tishrei marks Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. On this day, Jewish people observe the first of the High Holy Days. Rosh Hashanah is also a time that Jews celebrate G-d’s creation of the world and embark on personal paths of repentance. The holiday is deeply meaningful and a perfect time for parents to teach their children about Jewish customs. One of the best ways to celebrate and learn about Rosh Hashanah is through crafts inspired by the holiday.

So, is the Book of Life figurative or literal? Is it a poetic or a concrete use of words? I believe it is both. If God plays a hand in our destiny, then it might be that our fate is sealed already. However, we are told that “t’shuvah, tefillah and tzedakah” (repentance, prayer and charity) can change God’s decree. If this is so, we can create – or co create – our fate for the year. We can change God’s mind, if it were. We help God write our page in the Book of Life for the coming year – or for our whole life.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Glasses: Any fine dinner starts with glassware. Serving drinks in normal glass tumblers or cups just isn’t appropriate for a fine dining occasion. Choose short or long stem crystal glasses for a real touch of elegance. Consider using beverage specific glasses if alcohol is to be served.

The Jewish Calendar has twelve months, with Tishrei being the seventh month in the year. Your child can make their calendar using a standard month/calendar template with 35 squares. Using a traditional and Jewish calendar as guide, your child can mark the days of each month. Using stickers, markers and colored pencils, your child could add special occasions such as High Holy Days, the phases of the moon, other holidays, and birthdays to their calendar. In creating this useful and colorful Jewish calendar, your child will better understand days of the week, changes in seasons, and the dates of coming holidays.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.

He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year.

The first day of Tishrei marks Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. On this day, Jewish people observe the first of the High Holy Days. Rosh Hashanah is also a time that Jews celebrate G-d’s creation of the world and embark on personal paths of repentance. The holiday is deeply meaningful and a perfect time for parents to teach their children about Jewish customs. One of the best ways to celebrate and learn about Rosh Hashanah is through crafts inspired by the holiday.

So, is the Book of Life figurative or literal? Is it a poetic or a concrete use of words? I believe it is both. If God plays a hand in our destiny, then it might be that our fate is sealed already. However, we are told that “t’shuvah, tefillah and tzedakah” (repentance, prayer and charity) can change God’s decree. If this is so, we can create – or co create – our fate for the year. We can change God’s mind, if it were. We help God write our page in the Book of Life for the coming year – or for our whole life.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Glasses: Any fine dinner starts with glassware. Serving drinks in normal glass tumblers or cups just isn’t appropriate for a fine dining occasion. Choose short or long stem crystal glasses for a real touch of elegance. Consider using beverage specific glasses if alcohol is to be served.

The Jewish Calendar has twelve months, with Tishrei being the seventh month in the year. Your child can make their calendar using a standard month/calendar template with 35 squares. Using a traditional and Jewish calendar as guide, your child can mark the days of each month. Using stickers, markers and colored pencils, your child could add special occasions such as High Holy Days, the phases of the moon, other holidays, and birthdays to their calendar. In creating this useful and colorful Jewish calendar, your child will better understand days of the week, changes in seasons, and the dates of coming holidays.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.