What Is The Shofar, And How Is It Used During The High Holy Days?

What Is The Shofar, And How Is It Used During The High Holy Days?

Verbal arguments could turn physical very easily during this time, so avoid arguments at all costs. In an act of mercy, the Creator gives us a ten day grace period, to “get our act together”. The special horn is sounded at the end of the fast.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

The other group that differed in this stance of appointment was outraged, the Shiites. They believed that the torch should have been handed down by blood to someone in Muhammad’s family and today, their heritage can be traced back to Muhammad’s daughter, Fatima. Thus, the schism of sects occurred. The Sunnis believed in capability and the Shiites believed in blood when handing down political power and is still used today in Muslim nations.

Now before the feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end. And during supper, when the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray him, Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, rose from supper, laid aside his garments, and girded himself with a towel. Then he poured water into a basin, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel with which he was girded.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

So, is the Book of Life figurative or literal? Is it a poetic or a concrete use of words? I believe it is both. If God plays a hand in our destiny, then it might be that our fate is sealed already. However, we are told that “t’shuvah, tefillah and tzedakah” (repentance, prayer and charity) can change God’s decree. If this is so, we can create – or co create – our fate for the year. We can change God’s mind, if it were. We help God write our page in the Book of Life for the coming year – or for our whole life.

Please do not send me a card with Jesus in a manger. If you are going to send me a card please write or buy one that says Seasons Greetings. I am speaking for many who won’t or can’t speak. I am speaking for generations who came before me and who paid a huge price to be heard. I believe they would feel as I do.

Verbal arguments could turn physical very easily during this time, so avoid arguments at all costs. In an act of mercy, the Creator gives us a ten day grace period, to “get our act together”. The special horn is sounded at the end of the fast.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

The other group that differed in this stance of appointment was outraged, the Shiites. They believed that the torch should have been handed down by blood to someone in Muhammad’s family and today, their heritage can be traced back to Muhammad’s daughter, Fatima. Thus, the schism of sects occurred. The Sunnis believed in capability and the Shiites believed in blood when handing down political power and is still used today in Muslim nations.

Now before the feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end. And during supper, when the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray him, Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, rose from supper, laid aside his garments, and girded himself with a towel. Then he poured water into a basin, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel with which he was girded.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

So, is the Book of Life figurative or literal? Is it a poetic or a concrete use of words? I believe it is both. If God plays a hand in our destiny, then it might be that our fate is sealed already. However, we are told that “t’shuvah, tefillah and tzedakah” (repentance, prayer and charity) can change God’s decree. If this is so, we can create – or co create – our fate for the year. We can change God’s mind, if it were. We help God write our page in the Book of Life for the coming year – or for our whole life.

Please do not send me a card with Jesus in a manger. If you are going to send me a card please write or buy one that says Seasons Greetings. I am speaking for many who won’t or can’t speak. I am speaking for generations who came before me and who paid a huge price to be heard. I believe they would feel as I do.