Why Are Apples With Honey Eaten On Rosh Hashanah?

Why Are Apples With Honey Eaten On Rosh Hashanah?

Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. Consider using beverage specific glasses if alcohol is to be served. The Greek word, eido, meant be aware, consider, understand.

Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

Stop dating people because your parents expect you to marry another Jew, or another Catholic, or another whatever. Most people I know are not religious at all, yet a lot of these same non-religious people still feel the need to date within their own religion due to their parents and their upbringing.

Notably, many of these same adults do not themselves care about whether they marry someone of the same religion, but they won’t stand up and tell their parents that they are not going to pass the super-religious genes onto the next generation. To those people I say: It’s your life!

The other group that differed in this stance of appointment was outraged, the Shiites. They believed that the torch should have been handed down by blood to someone in Muhammad’s family and today, their heritage can be traced back to Muhammad’s daughter, Fatima. Thus, the schism of sects occurred. The Sunnis believed in capability and the Shiites believed in blood when handing down political power and is still used today in Muslim nations.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

We’ve spent a few weeks preparing for Rosh Hashanah, Judging our Dreams, Mastering the Exit, excited for our Grand Entrance. We have carefully examined our lives and promised to improve. We are planning for the coming year, but, as this week’s portion, “Nitzavim,” “Standers,” reminds us, in one week we too will have our big moment; we will stand before the King. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent. We have climbed our way out of the past, prepared for our entrance into the New Year, but there is one moment that defines our future: The moment we stand before God. How will we stand?

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. Consider using beverage specific glasses if alcohol is to be served. The Greek word, eido, meant be aware, consider, understand.

Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

Stop dating people because your parents expect you to marry another Jew, or another Catholic, or another whatever. Most people I know are not religious at all, yet a lot of these same non-religious people still feel the need to date within their own religion due to their parents and their upbringing.

Notably, many of these same adults do not themselves care about whether they marry someone of the same religion, but they won’t stand up and tell their parents that they are not going to pass the super-religious genes onto the next generation. To those people I say: It’s your life!

The other group that differed in this stance of appointment was outraged, the Shiites. They believed that the torch should have been handed down by blood to someone in Muhammad’s family and today, their heritage can be traced back to Muhammad’s daughter, Fatima. Thus, the schism of sects occurred. The Sunnis believed in capability and the Shiites believed in blood when handing down political power and is still used today in Muslim nations.

The month of Elul is a time for preparation, because it precedes Tishrei and the coming High Holy Holidays. As part of the preparation, a Jewish person seeks to reconnect with oneself. The shofar is then blown each day of Elul, except the Sabbath. This is done as a reminder to the Jewish person of their history, traditions and covenant with G-d.

We’ve spent a few weeks preparing for Rosh Hashanah, Judging our Dreams, Mastering the Exit, excited for our Grand Entrance. We have carefully examined our lives and promised to improve. We are planning for the coming year, but, as this week’s portion, “Nitzavim,” “Standers,” reminds us, in one week we too will have our big moment; we will stand before the King. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent. We have climbed our way out of the past, prepared for our entrance into the New Year, but there is one moment that defines our future: The moment we stand before God. How will we stand?

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.